Social media, from the Twitterverse to Instagram to Ello, in all the myriad ways we connect with one another, seems as though it could not have been more explosive than it was in 2014. And, as I write those words, I fully realize that 2015 will likely find ways to exceed the excesses of this past year. Trouble is, I don't know if that makes me feel hopeful, or apprehensive.

We remember the stories. The Sochi Olympics helped usher in Russia's power and influence in the first half of the year, only to see the ruble in freefall at year's end. Ellen's selfie at the Oscar ceremony broke the Internet. The World Cup brought thrilling surprises to sport's biggest stage. Boko Haram and ISIL served to remind us of the monstrosity that lurks in the world, just as Malala Yousafzai reminded us of humanity's grace. Race relations in the United States became a subject of national reflection. Two airliners from the same company met unimaginable fates. The deadliest known outbreak of Ebola infected over 18 thousand souls. Sony was hacked, presumably by representatives of a foreign power. The funniest man in the world took his own life. All of these events were brought more sharply into focus because of the instantaneous power of social media.

And, yet, there was the ALS Bucket Challenge. It was fun, it was silly, it prompted some astonishingly creative one-upsmanship, and it raised awareness and over $100 million dollars for a most worthy cause. The death of Robin Williams drove many to seek help in their darkest times that might not have. And Malala stood on a stage in Oslo and received the Nobel Peace Prize.

Bring it on, 2015. Bring it on.

Gary Locke
By Gary Locke

A semi-professional hyphenate and the Content Editor for CommonPlaces. He has enjoyed a long career in theater and multimedia, and still hopes to one day drive the Batmobile.

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